Fuck Yeah, Jhonen Vasquez

Fuck Yeah, Jhonen Vasquez is a blog featuring past and present work, interviews, screen caps, discussion, and more about Jhonen Vasquez. Check out Fuck Yeah, Jhonen Vasquez Fan Art for appreciative artwork.


PANELLING IS A THEME BY MIRANDA

"When I looked at the original art, I was a bit horrified at how lax I  was in cleaning the pages up at all before apparently sending them off  to become a professionally made comic product.  These bristol pages were  attacked with heavy #2 pencils for sketches, not non-photo reproducible   blue-line pencil, and then that same piece of paper, usually, was gone  over with ink for the inking stage.  The original art still has a LOT  of the original pencil work all over it, which makes me wonder if I  owned an eraser back then.
Now, photographing those pages and losing information over a few  passes sorta helped out there, leaving the mostly sharp lifework to be  visible, but scanning these pages digitally, well that isn’t nearly as  merciful as that original process.  For the pages that were simply black  and white lifework, it’s not as bad, but, depending on the  page, it could still be pretty bad, with the pencil work translating as  crusty black pixellation, and no amount of adjusting the image threshold  results in a perfect image.  Those pages I’d have to go into Photoshop  and whittle away with the eraser until all the horrible black smudges  were mostly removed, being careful to reference the paper comics to see  which smudges had simply just become part of the book by this point and  which were simply ugly blemishes.
This was bad, but not really bad bad.
Then there were the pages that had the grayscale work on them.  Holy  crap.  So those pages were done with markers on photocopies of the  original artwork, and those had to be scanned as grayscale images, and  that meant less ability to just nullify the smudges without nullifying  the range of gray shades.  Then you had the fact that the paper texture  made its way into the file as well, along with every Cheeto stain or  whatnot that might have been on the original.  Cleaning those pages up  was actually not very fun at all, and I guess now I know how it feels to  work in those diamond mines you see in those movies about people who  work in diamond mines starring Djimon Honsou.
So “fixing” JTHM for digital versions partly means cleaning up stuff  that people haven’t ever seen thanks to how much less clarity there was  originally.  They’ll still be treated to artwork that’s much much more  detailed than the originals, and that’s kind of cool, but my job was to  keep all the filth out so as not to have the digital versions actually  be less attractive and polished than what people have been used to.  The  difference is like knowing someone only from their Facebook photos and  then meeting them in person and suddenly being horrified at how much  hair they have in places that should not have hair.  WHY do they have  hairy eyelids?  This date was a mistake…A TERRIBLE MISTAKE.”
Read more about the process behind the JTHM digitals at Mindspill - Johnny The Digicidal Maniac: UPDATE DEUX!
Text and photo via here.

"When I looked at the original art, I was a bit horrified at how lax I was in cleaning the pages up at all before apparently sending them off to become a professionally made comic product.  These bristol pages were attacked with heavy #2 pencils for sketches, not non-photo reproducible  blue-line pencil, and then that same piece of paper, usually, was gone over with ink for the inking stage.  The original art still has a LOT of the original pencil work all over it, which makes me wonder if I owned an eraser back then.

Now, photographing those pages and losing information over a few passes sorta helped out there, leaving the mostly sharp lifework to be visible, but scanning these pages digitally, well that isn’t nearly as merciful as that original process.  For the pages that were simply black and white lifework, it’s not as bad, but, depending on the page, it could still be pretty bad, with the pencil work translating as crusty black pixellation, and no amount of adjusting the image threshold results in a perfect image.  Those pages I’d have to go into Photoshop and whittle away with the eraser until all the horrible black smudges were mostly removed, being careful to reference the paper comics to see which smudges had simply just become part of the book by this point and which were simply ugly blemishes.

This was bad, but not really bad bad.

Then there were the pages that had the grayscale work on them.  Holy crap.  So those pages were done with markers on photocopies of the original artwork, and those had to be scanned as grayscale images, and that meant less ability to just nullify the smudges without nullifying the range of gray shades.  Then you had the fact that the paper texture made its way into the file as well, along with every Cheeto stain or whatnot that might have been on the original.  Cleaning those pages up was actually not very fun at all, and I guess now I know how it feels to work in those diamond mines you see in those movies about people who work in diamond mines starring Djimon Honsou.

So “fixing” JTHM for digital versions partly means cleaning up stuff that people haven’t ever seen thanks to how much less clarity there was originally.  They’ll still be treated to artwork that’s much much more detailed than the originals, and that’s kind of cool, but my job was to keep all the filth out so as not to have the digital versions actually be less attractive and polished than what people have been used to.  The difference is like knowing someone only from their Facebook photos and then meeting them in person and suddenly being horrified at how much hair they have in places that should not have hair.  WHY do they have hairy eyelids?  This date was a mistake…A TERRIBLE MISTAKE.”

Read more about the process behind the JTHM digitals at Mindspill - Johnny The Digicidal Maniac: UPDATE DEUX!

Text and photo via here.

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